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Lagging behind opening to migrants damages industries

Australia is lagging behind opening up to international visa holders and it is hurting many industries, some already hit hard by COVID and now by staff shortages.


Staff shortages are hitting regional and metropolitan areas as it comes hand-in-hand with the lack of international students and working holiday makers, on top of that some venues have seen chefs return home overseas.


Then it seems some workers have moved across to other industries now that the worker shortage is hitting, and they have a pick of jobs available to them.


This is all coming at the very worst time; not only are lockdowns over in all states and people are keen to go out and enjoy the world but with Christmas just a month away the rush will get even worse.


The ABC has reported the Central Victoria’s hospitality sector has some businesses unable to open due to a lack of workers while others may be forced to reduce hours. "It's just gradually got worse. You're not getting the number of staff coming in and moving around, especially that the borders are closed. No backpackers, skilled migrants or international students," Mr Whelan told the ABC.


Mr Whelan, who pays above award wages, said the shortage of bakers could soon see his business cut back on hours.


The ABC reported that Sean Kierce who owns the Ladro restaurants said they were struggling to find staff, they had employed 45 full-time and casual staff but now were trying to make ends meet with just 20. In an interview with the Herald-Sun, Scott Morrison told the paper that “skilled migration will be back to normal by the first half of next year to ease critical workforce shortages across the country”. He told 9News that: “We are going to have a business led recovery here in Australia.”


The federal government is hopeful to be able to move to “stage two” of its international border reopening to bring in skilled workers to fill the shortages across Australia but nothing on when that is to happen.


As for international students it seems that many other countries have opened their borders to welcome students and now Canada, the US and the UK are looking more attractive as they have opened up. Australia is yet to nominate a date for international students to re-enter and this is causing problems not just in the educational sector but for many other industries relying on them as employees.


Assent Migration Lawyers helped many Australian employers solve skills shortages through the recruitment of talented overseas nationals.

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